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Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Array Strip

Proven performance from the industry standard

The Affymetrix® Human Genome U133+ PM Array Strip enables expression profiling of four samples at a time using the same content as the GeneChip® HT HG-U133+ PM Array Plate and industry-standard GeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. All three array types use a total of 54,675 probe sets; however, the array strip and array plates have two major design changes from the Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Cartridge Array:

  • Only perfect match (PM) probes from the cartridge design were retained, while mismatch probes were removed.
  • Empirical data was used to select the best-performing probes, resulting in reducing the number of PM probes
    • 42,461 probe sets were reduced from 11 to 9 probes
    • 6 probe sets were reduced from 11 to 10
    • 12,208 probe sets remained unchanged

Key Benefits

  • Enables you to measure:
  • 47,000 transcripts and variants
  • More than 38,500 genes, including 33,000 well-characterized genes and UniGene clusters per sample
  • Enables increased productivity and efficiency through parallel processing
  • Process four samples on a single array strip
  • Delivers the same industry-leading performance and content as the GeneChip HT HG-U133+ PM Array Plate and Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array in cartridge format
  • Strong signal and fold change correlation to previous designs
  • Provides multiple independent measurements per transcript for increased confidence in your results
  • Interrogates more sequence than a single probe measurement
  • Is conveniently packaged
  • Includes all processing trays needed for array strip hybridization, washing, staining and imaging.

Content Profile

Sequences used in the design of the arrays were selected from GenBank®, dbEST, and RefSeq. The majority of sequence clusters were created from the UniGene database (Build 133, April 20, 2001) and refined by analysis and comparison with a number of other publicly available databases, including the Washington University EST trace repository and the University of California, Santa Cruz Golden-Path human genome database (April 2001 release).

An additional set of sequence clusters were created from Build 159 of UniGene (January 25, 2003) and refined by analysis and comparison with a number of other publicly available databases, including the Washington University EST trace repository and the NCBI human genome assembly (Build 31). Sequences were further analyzed for correct orientation, false priming, false clustering, alternative splicing, and alternative polyadenylation.